Blame Someone Else Day 2013

For ‘Blame Someone Else Day’ United Webcomics are revealing their influences. That’s right, all this stuff we’ve been making is THEIR fault 😉

Shaun influences complete
I’m Shaun, artist on Lacey Investigations talking you through my inspirations (excellent idea, whoever came up with this!). Mike and I grew up together so a lot of our influences were the same but page space has it’s restrictions so I went with the most important to me. The first “woman” I ever loved, and still do, Jessica Rabbit with Roger and Eddie Valiant in the background, my first taste of detective tales in the late 80’s, early 90’s Mike and I were swept in the turtle power movement so I included Donatello, Michelangelo and Master Splinter, mid 90’s Mike introduced me to a cartoon called X-Men and this was the catalyst that started my love of reading and creating comics (and Psylocke). Lurking in the background but very badly drawn is Leon S. Kennedy, the kind of character I would love Nick to be. And finally, Gizmo because Gremlins rule!!
Thanks for looking and reading Lacey Investigations.
tribute to seuss
Besides enjoying his books as a kid, as an adult I gained an appreciation for his quirky and whimsical style. He has influenced me kind of accidentally; I have drawn some cartoons in the past and later looked at them and thought (usually with a laugh) “those look like Seuss!” I don’t think it’s widely known he was a great anti-Hitler propagandist and political cartoonist during WWII. Brilliant pre-Cat in the Hat stuff. – Jerry McMasters of Webcomic Pete
Tamora Pierce is a fantasy author who has been a big influence on me, particularly her ‘Song of the Lioness’ quartet. Her books literally saved my life and inspired me to create my own stories.  Alanna of Trebond is a red-headed heroine who disguises herself as a boy so that she can become a Knight, rather than being schooled as a Lady as is expected of her. Alanna is true to herself and overcomes gender discrimination. My character Amuletts was originally based on another character in the series: the lovable rogue George. (She’s changed a bit since meeting Loki).
Tamora Pierce is a fantasy author who has been a big influence on me, particularly her ‘Song of the Lioness’ quartet. Her books literally saved my life and inspired me to create my own stories.
Alanna of Trebond is a red-headed heroine who disguises herself as a boy so that she can become a Knight, rather than being schooled as a Lady as is expected of her.
Alanna is true to herself and overcomes gender discrimination.
My character Amuletts was originally based on another character in the series: the lovable rogue George. (She’s changed a bit since meeting Loki). – Amy Letts of Epic Fail.
First I'd like to say thanks to Amy, for coming up with this idea. It's a belter and I've thoroughly enjoyed doing it (It's not everyday you get to draw Peter Venkman trying to catch a Boo, or Commander Shepard and Smiffy dancing to Link's Ocarina now is it?). So here, from left to right, are some of my influences: 1. Super Mario Brothers, (1,2,3 and Super Mario World.) Back in the day there was Sega and there was Nintendo and school playgrounds across Great Britain were divided. You loved Sonic or you loved Mario. There was no middle ground and thus Fan boyism was born. 2.The Legend Of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time. Wow, just.. just wow. What a game. The only reason to buy an N64 and the greatest game of all time. (Note: Actually Lylat wars was pretty amazing too. Shit, should have put Fox McCloud on there. Even though his last couple of games have been toss.) 3. The Bash Street Kids (The Beano). Back in the day the kids from class iiB ruled. They were responsible for my eternal love of comic books.  4.Commander Shepard (Mass Effect series) The only game to come close to taking Ocarina's crown and proof that storytelling definitely has a place in video games. (Even if gamers do whine like little girls if they don't get a super happy ending wrapped in a big pink bow.) Lost credibility when Bioware caved in to the pressure to change the ending.  5. Ghostbusters. Seriously, who doesn't love this movie? 6. Count Duckula. The vegetarian vampire duck voiced brilliantly by David Jason. 7. Buffy The Vampire Slayer. (Seasons 1-3) In the early years this was the perfect T.V series. Lost it's way after season 3, but a prime example of Joss Whedon's work and paved the way for his future success. No Buffy? No Avengers movie. (Well, there probably would have been, but it wouldn't have been very good.) 8. Helen Ripley (Alien, Aliens) Another example of a pitch perfect series going bad, the first two movies were classic and it was through Weaver's Ripley that I developed my love for strong women characters. Funnily enough, Whedon was involved with the ridiculous fourth movie "Resurrection" , so not everything he spins is gold. 9. Teenage Mutant Ninja (Hero) Turtles. Ok, so here in blighty we got the watered down "Hero" version, but still, for a ten year old it doesn't get any better. 10. Street Fighter 2: Special championship turbo alpha vs x-men new challengers x tekken 3rd strike edition. Yes I realise that Cammy walks around with her ass out, which completely goes against what I said about strong female characters,  what can I say? I'm a complicated person. Ha-Dooouu-ken! Awesome. 11. Pokémon (Blue and Red) I was far too old for Pokémon when it came out on the Gameboy. Did I buy it anyway? Yes. Yes I did. 12. John McLane, (Die Hard 1,2,3) Wrong place at the wrong time? Maybe, but I still watch this every Christmas eve. McLane is the main influence behind Mike Lacey's character. My favourite movie character of all time. (But he should stop making them now, the last two were pants.) 13. The X-men. So, you're twelve years old and are getting bored of watching a highly trained ninja using his razor sharp katana to fling noodles at a giant warthog, where do you go from here? Oh hey... What's this? Wow that guy shoots lasers out of his face. And check out the dude with the blades coming out of his wrists! (Wrists Jackman, not knuckles.) So began my twenty year love affair with the X-men. This probably also nurtured my unrealistic expectations of how women's bodies should look. Damn you reality! 14. Spider-man. (The amazing 1960's-2010ish) Lee and Ditko created something really special with this title. The hero was an everyday kid, with everyday problems. He wasn't the strongest, the fastest, or the most powerful, he wasn't a billionaire playboy, but he had a brain in his head and he knew how to use it. Throughout his run, particularly in the early days The Amazing Spider-man has been my favourite superhero and his supporting cast has been unique and special, with quality characters that are actually likeable (Sorry Olsen, but you're an annoying ginge.). There is a reason the cast in Lacey Investigations is so large, my tribute to Lee and Ditko, my main inspiration for creating comics The Amazing Spider-man.
First I’d like to say thanks to Amy, for coming up with this idea.
It’s a belter and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed doing it (It’s not everyday you get to draw Peter Venkman trying to catch a Boo, or Commander Shepard and Smiffy dancing to Link’s Ocarina now is it?).
So here, from left to right, are some of my influences:
1. Super Mario Brothers, (1,2,3 and Super Mario World.)
Back in the day there was Sega and there was Nintendo and school playgrounds across Great Britain were divided. You loved Sonic or you loved Mario. There was no middle ground and thus Fan boyism was born.
2.The Legend Of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time.
Wow, just.. just wow. What a game. The only reason to buy an N64 and the greatest game of all time.
(Note: Actually Lylat wars was pretty amazing too. Shit, should have put Fox McCloud on there. Even though his last couple of games have been toss.)
3. The Bash Street Kids (The Beano).
Back in the day the kids from class iiB ruled. They were responsible for my eternal love of comic books.
4.Commander Shepard (Mass Effect series)
The only game to come close to taking Ocarina’s crown and proof that storytelling definitely has a place in video games. (Even if gamers do whine like little girls if they don’t get a super happy ending wrapped in a big pink bow.) Lost credibility when Bioware caved in to the pressure to change the ending.
5. Ghostbusters.
Seriously, who doesn’t love this movie?
6. Count Duckula.
The vegetarian vampire duck voiced brilliantly by David Jason.
7. Buffy The Vampire Slayer. (Seasons 1-3)
In the early years this was the perfect T.V series. Lost it’s way after season 3, but a prime example of Joss Whedon’s work and paved the way for his future success. No Buffy? No Avengers movie. (Well, there probably would have been, but it wouldn’t have been very good.)
8. Helen Ripley (Alien, Aliens)
Another example of a pitch perfect series going bad, the first two movies were classic and it was through Weaver’s Ripley that I developed my love for strong women characters. Funnily enough, Whedon was involved with the ridiculous fourth movie “Resurrection” , so not everything he spins is gold.
9. Teenage Mutant Ninja (Hero) Turtles.
Ok, so here in blighty we got the watered down “Hero” version, but still, for a ten year old it doesn’t get any better.
10. Street Fighter 2: Special championship turbo alpha vs x-men new challengers x tekken 3rd strike edition.
Yes I realise that Cammy walks around with her ass out, which completely goes against what I said about strong female characters, what can I say? I’m a complicated person. Ha-Dooouu-ken! Awesome.
11. Pokémon (Blue and Red)
I was far too old for Pokémon when it came out on the Gameboy. Did I buy it anyway? Yes. Yes I did.
12. John McLane, (Die Hard 1,2,3)
Wrong place at the wrong time? Maybe, but I still watch this every Christmas eve. McLane is the main influence behind Mike Lacey’s character. My favourite movie character of all time. (But he should stop making them now, the last two were pants.)
13. The X-men.
So, you’re twelve years old and are getting bored of watching a highly trained ninja using his razor sharp katana to fling noodles at a giant warthog, where do you go from here?
Oh hey… What’s this? Wow that guy shoots lasers out of his face. And check out the dude with the blades coming out of his wrists! (Wrists Jackman, not knuckles.) So began my twenty year love affair with the X-men. This probably also nurtured my unrealistic expectations of how women’s bodies should look. Damn you reality!
14. Spider-man. (The amazing 1960’s-2010ish)
Lee and Ditko created something really special with this title. The hero was an everyday kid, with everyday problems. He wasn’t the strongest, the fastest, or the most powerful, he wasn’t a billionaire playboy, but he had a brain in his head and he knew how to use it. Throughout his run, particularly in the early days The Amazing Spider-man has been my favourite superhero and his supporting cast has been unique and special, with quality characters that are actually likeable (Sorry Olsen, but you’re an annoying ginge.). There is a reason the cast in Lacey Investigations is so large, my tribute to Lee and Ditko, my main inspiration for creating comics The Amazing Spider-man. – Michael Aston of Lacey Investigations.

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